micropolisnyc:

Until recently, European tourists seeking poverty-porn have been crowding onto buses to ride through “a real New York City ‘GHETTO,’” i.e., the Bronx.
The controversy that erupted over the tour caused the operator, Real Bronx Tours, to drop it today. 
But the NY Post tagged along last week as one tour guide, Lynn Battaglia,made snide comments and gazed at impoverished locals.

As the bus idled across from historic St. Ann’s Episcopalian Church, Battaglia launched into a description of the crime, poverty and violence that plagued the South Bronx during the 1970s recession.
As she spoke, a line of two dozen poor people — including one man visibly agitated by the onlookers — waited for handouts from the church pantry.
“I don’t know what that line’s about, but every Wednesday we see it,” Battaglia told the tourists. “We see them go in with empty carts, and we see them come out with carts full.”

Bronx Borough President slammed Real Bronx Tours last week:

“To have foreigners come and gawk at a long line of people who are less fortunate than they are and to make money off of that and to view them as they are some sort of entertainment is pretty disgusting.”



Agree with all of the above; but isn’t this just the next step of Detroit and other post-industrial cities like Cleveland and Pittsburgh’s “ruin porn”?
What did we expect? It’s perfectly acceptable to photograph, tour, sell books and films on rust belt cities like Detroit (including their inhabitants), but now it’s an issue when it’s NYC? 

micropolisnyc:

Until recently, European tourists seeking poverty-porn have been crowding onto buses to ride through “a real New York City ‘GHETTO,’” i.e., the Bronx.

The controversy that erupted over the tour caused the operator, Real Bronx Tours, to drop it today. 

But the NY Post tagged along last week as one tour guide, Lynn Battaglia,made snide comments and gazed at impoverished locals.

As the bus idled across from historic St. Ann’s Episcopalian Church, Battaglia launched into a description of the crime, poverty and violence that plagued the South Bronx during the 1970s recession.

As she spoke, a line of two dozen poor people — including one man visibly agitated by the onlookers — waited for handouts from the church pantry.

“I don’t know what that line’s about, but every Wednesday we see it,” Battaglia told the tourists. “We see them go in with empty carts, and we see them come out with carts full.”

Bronx Borough President slammed Real Bronx Tours last week:

“To have foreigners come and gawk at a long line of people who are less fortunate than they are and to make money off of that and to view them as they are some sort of entertainment is pretty disgusting.”

Agree with all of the above; but isn’t this just the next step of Detroit and other post-industrial cities like Cleveland and Pittsburgh’s “ruin porn”?

What did we expect? It’s perfectly acceptable to photograph, tour, sell books and films on rust belt cities like Detroit (including their inhabitants), but now it’s an issue when it’s NYC? 

(via wnyc)

nycedc:

Our new Take the HELM competition rewards and promotes new Lower Manhattan tenants that can bring the best and brightest employees to the neighborhood, with the potential to add more in the near future; continue the re-branding of Lower Manhattan as a hub of innovative businesses poised for growth; and diversify the economic base of this 85-million square foot central business district, complementing the financial sector.
To encourage business growth in Lower Manhattan, Take the HELM is looking to award four $250,000 cash grants to the following types of companies:
Creative: If you’re a creative company, Take the HELM wants to reward you for joining Condé Nast, SHoP Architects, The Paris Review, and XO Group in Lower Manhattan. 
Tech: If you’re a technology company, Take the HELM wants to welcome you to a neighborhood that has nearly doubled its tech presence in the last five years.
New New Yorkers: If you’re a company from outside New York City, Take the HELM will help you establish roots in Lower Manhattan and continue the neighborhood’s appeal to the world’s best and brightest.
Startups: If you’re a startup less than three years old, Take the HELM will help you build an office and connect you with the neighborhood’s burgeoning startup community.  
Take the HELM will select up to 20 finalists that best meet the goals of the competition and seek to open an office in Lower Manhattan. Finalists will each receive a $10,000 cash grant and an opportunity to interview with the distinguished Selection Committee, and will participate in two days of exclusive business development programs in Lower Manhattan. Up to four Take the HELM winners will receive an additional $250,000. At least one $250,000 prize will be reserved for startup applicants.
Interested? Find out more at www.taketheHELMnyc.com. Applications are due November 30, 2012.


Proud of all the activity in my old neighborhood. Lower Manhattan ftw.

nycedc:

Our new Take the HELM competition rewards and promotes new Lower Manhattan tenants that can bring the best and brightest employees to the neighborhood, with the potential to add more in the near future; continue the re-branding of Lower Manhattan as a hub of innovative businesses poised for growth; and diversify the economic base of this 85-million square foot central business district, complementing the financial sector.

To encourage business growth in Lower Manhattan, Take the HELM is looking to award four $250,000 cash grants to the following types of companies:

  • Creative: If you’re a creative company, Take the HELM wants to reward you for joining Condé Nast, SHoP Architects, The Paris Review, and XO Group in Lower Manhattan. 
  • Tech: If you’re a technology company, Take the HELM wants to welcome you to a neighborhood that has nearly doubled its tech presence in the last five years.
  • New New Yorkers: If you’re a company from outside New York City, Take the HELM will help you establish roots in Lower Manhattan and continue the neighborhood’s appeal to the world’s best and brightest.
  • Startups: If you’re a startup less than three years old, Take the HELM will help you build an office and connect you with the neighborhood’s burgeoning startup community.  

Take the HELM will select up to 20 finalists that best meet the goals of the competition and seek to open an office in Lower Manhattan. Finalists will each receive a $10,000 cash grant and an opportunity to interview with the distinguished Selection Committee, and will participate in two days of exclusive business development programs in Lower Manhattan. Up to four Take the HELM winners will receive an additional $250,000. At least one $250,000 prize will be reserved for startup applicants.

Interested? Find out more at www.taketheHELMnyc.com. Applications are due November 30, 2012.

Proud of all the activity in my old neighborhood. Lower Manhattan ftw.

(via fastcompany)

nycedc:


“At the Brooklyn Navy Yard, industrial buildings are being rejuvenated so that people can do what they always did there: make things.”
- Justin Davidson, New York Magazine

Manufacturing is making a comeback in Brooklyn. The borough, which in recent years has become synonymous with the artisanal revolution, is returning to its industrial roots with a 21st century spin. On a 300-acre plot of land between Williamsburg and DUMBO lies the remnants of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. This summer, construction began, transforming several existing buildings in the Navy Yard into Green Manufacturing Center, which is expected to be completed in 18 months, and The New Lab, a collaborative design and fabrication laboratory that already has several tenants lined up.
While Brooklyn manufacturers are no longer turning out spools of thread on an assembly line, modern technology has enabled the return of manufacturing, and with it, jobs. 
Read more in MetroFocus: “A Manufacturing Renaissance at the Brooklyn Navy Yard” and learn about NYCEDC’s Industrial initiatives.
Rendering courtesy of Macro Sea

nycedc:

“At the Brooklyn Navy Yard, industrial buildings are being rejuvenated so that people can do what they always did there: make things.”

Justin Davidson, New York Magazine

Manufacturing is making a comeback in Brooklyn. The borough, which in recent years has become synonymous with the artisanal revolution, is returning to its industrial roots with a 21st century spin. On a 300-acre plot of land between Williamsburg and DUMBO lies the remnants of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. This summer, construction began, transforming several existing buildings in the Navy Yard into Green Manufacturing Center, which is expected to be completed in 18 months, and The New Lab, a collaborative design and fabrication laboratory that already has several tenants lined up.

While Brooklyn manufacturers are no longer turning out spools of thread on an assembly line, modern technology has enabled the return of manufacturing, and with it, jobs.

Read more in MetroFocus: “A Manufacturing Renaissance at the Brooklyn Navy Yard” and learn about NYCEDC’s Industrial initiatives.

Rendering courtesy of Macro Sea